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Bills Associated with Juvenile Detention Coalition of Iowa

Bill Number: HF2247
Title: Judicial Branch Administration
Description:

Makes changes to judicial branch administration. Removes the requirement for the judicial council to create best practices for court-assigned advocates for individuals with mental illnesses. Dictates what personal information of jurors will be available to the public and allows attorneys to complete juror questionnaires without a court order. Includes remote testimony done by telephone or video conference in the definition of open court. Allows criminal history records of an accused individual or of witnesses to be given to attorneys, prosecutors, or individuals representing themselves, without a court order.

Signed by Governor May 1, 2024. Takes effect July 1, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Crime & Courts
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: HF2586
Title: School Security
Description:

Requires school districts with at least 8,000 students to employ security personnel to guard all school buildings where 9th through 12th grade students attend, unless a majority of that districts school board votes otherwise. Allows school employees to be issued a permit to carry firearms provided they complete a firearm safety training. School employees who possess this permit to have qualified immunity from criminal or civil liability. The bill further requires private security officers and school employees who are licensed to carry a firearm on school property under this bill to participate in annual live scenario training and quarterly live firearms training provided by the Department of Public Safety (DPS). Signed by Governor April 19, 2024. Takes effect July 1, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Education
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: HF2612
Title: AEA/Special Education Reform
Description:

Charges Iowa Department of Education (DE) to oversee AEA operations, beginning July 1, 2025. Creates a Division of Special Eduation in DE (13 employees plus 5 employees located in each AEA). Makes local AEA Boards advisory. Permits AEAs to provide evidence-based professional development services within their AEA boundary. Requires AEA administrators be licensed teachers with either a special education endorsement or special education suppor t authorization. Caps AEA administrator salaries at average salary of school administrators within the AEA boundaries.  Requires AEA to establish collaborative relationships with other community agencies. Sets up an AEA Task Force to make further recommendations. Makes changes to AEA funding beginning 7/1/2025 (100% special education goes to schools and schools must use their designated AEA; media services fully fee-for-service (all goes to schools); 100% professional development goes to schools for first year then becomes fully fee for service on 7/1/2026). Bill summary at: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fjBdDTtw4UMc7731FX-lPYBRKy_NnBRtiUquU8_f1jk/edit. Signed by governor March 27, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Education
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Undecided
Bill Number: HF2673
Title: Behavioral Health Service System
Description:

Transitions mental health and disabilities services system to a behavioral health service system, and transfers disability services to the HHS' division of aging and disability services. Transition to become effective July 1, 2025.  Behavioral Health System: Disbands the current mental health & disability services regional system on July 1, 2025.  Clarifies HHS is the state's mental health authority and describes broadly the core service domains that will be made available statewide through the new district system. HHS is to select an administrative services organization (ASO), which may be a non-profit organization or governmental agency, to manage services within a behavioral health district. Each district will have a ten-member advisory committee made up of three local elected officials, three people with experience or education in behavioral health, three people with lived experience (at least one of which must a child/adolescent), and a member of law enforcement.  Makes a lot of changes related to collection and sharing of data. Freezes per capita funding for the MH/DS system for this year.  Aging & Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs): Moves disability services from the regional MH/DS system to the ADRC network. ADRCs may be a non-profit organization, area agency on aging, or governmental agency. Individuals with developmental disabilities and brain injuries are clearly listed as a part of this new system (they are not targeted populations in the current system). Includes individuals with a chronic mental illness in this portion of the service system. States that ADRCs will also manage services for children and youth, not just adults (as they are currently mandated). Timeline:  HHS to post transition plan on website for public comment by July 1, 2024.  Maps of behavioral health regions are to be finalized by August 1, 2024 and ASOs selected by December 31, 2024.  BH regions and new ADRCs are to be operational by July 1, 2025. Other Changes: Adds back language that prohibits tobacco retailers/wholesalers from having tobacco or cigarette give-aways, promotions, or gifts to incentivize use of smoking. Allows youth 12-years-old and older to give consent to tobacco cessation treatment. Makes a lot of conforming changes.  Allows supported community living to be provided to persons age 16 and older with a mental illness, brain injury, intellectual disability or developmental disability (allows social services block grant and other appropriate funds to be used to help pay for this), effective upon enactment (5/15/2024). Eliminates Special Intellectual Disability Units at the state's Mental Health Institutes (MHIs) - they no longer exist.  Signed by Governor May 15, 2024. Takes effect July 1, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Behavioral/Mental Health
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: HF2686
Title: Reorganization 2.0
Description:

Makes the following changes to organization, structure, and functions of state and local governments and adjusts code to to reflect these changes.

Division 1 -- Department of Natural Resources (DNR) -- grants the director of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) the authority to designate specific children from the state training school to carry out tasks for the DNR within state parks, game and forest areas, and other DNR-controlled lands. Eliminates the requirement for DNR to offer permanent housing to these children.
Division 2 -- Department of Inspections, Appeals, and Licensing (DIAL) -- states that the workers’ compensation commissioner serves at the governor's discretion rather than having a fixed term. Removes the requirement for full-time executive directors for certain boards and allows for the appointment of one individual to serve as executive director for multiple boards. Adjusts the handling of contractor registration fees, consolidating them into a single fund and repealing a related fund. Revises fee-setting procedures for health-related professional boards, granting oversight to the DIAL and requiring annual reviews to ensure fees cover expenses and are comparable to those in other states. Corrects a reference in the state plumbing code and expands the definition of licensing boards to include the real estate appraiser examining board. Aligns references in various sections with recent updates to the department's structure.
Division 3 -- Department of Transportation (DOT) -- transfers the rulemaking authority for safety regulations regarding the movement of implements of husbandry and animal-drawn vehicles on roadways from the DOT to the Department of Public Safety (DPS). Changes the deadline for presenting the DOT's proposed budget to the state transportation commission. Grants the DOT director authority to establish divisions within the DOT as needed. Specifies the DOT's responsibility for departmental operations, planning, programming, highway programs, modal programs, and enforcement activities. 
Division 4 -- Department of Education  (DE) -- gives the DE director authority to assign duties to various divisions within DE and allows for the reassignment of specific responsibilities within DE from July 1, 2024. Modifies salary and benefit handling for full-time salaried employees working less than 12 months per year and permits the employment of hourly staff for less than 12 months annually, with specific wage and benefit protocols outlined. Extends certain extracurricular contract and coaching endorsement provisions to employees of the Iowa educational services for the blind and visually impaired program and employees of the Iowa school for the deaf. Introduces a new code section exempting salaried employees of these programs from vacation leave provisions, instead providing for the accrual of personal leave days. References to "professional" staff are replaced with "salaried" staff. Applies procedures regarding staff discretion and dismissal to salaried staff.
Division 5 -- Department of Corrections (DOC) -- clarifies the governing body when a reserve peace officer is employed by the state of Iowa. Removes certain language related to employees of judicial district departments of correctional services due to their integration into the DOC. Community-based corrections facilities under the DOC's responsibilities for offender control, treatment, and rehabilitation. Adjusts provisions regarding district directors' duties, authority, and compensation. Modifies the coordination between the DOC and judicial district departments for inmate quartering and supervision after working hours. 
Division 6 -- Department of Revenue (DOR) -- specifies that the Iowa Lottery Division is a division within DOR. Changes various provisions governing the duties of the Iowa Lottery administrator, including reporting requirements and board meeting procedures. Grants the DOR the authority to operate self-service kiosks for lottery ticket distribution and adjust distribution requirements accordingly. Makes adjustments to sections regarding lottery retailer selection, license handling, prize awards, and security protocols, replacing outdated terms and clarifying responsibilities. Establishes an exception for the Iowa Lottery Division within DOR's authority to establish, abolish, and consolidate divisions. 
Division 7 -- Iowa Department of Workforce Development (IWD) --  includes the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training Program, which is jointly administered with HHS, in the list of programs managed by the IWD. Removes the requirement for community colleges to jointly implement adult education and literacy programs with IWD. However, IWD is still mandated to consult with community colleges when establishing standards and adopting rules for administering the program.
Division 8 -- Department of Public Safety (DPS) -- removes the requirement for the director of the Office of Drug Control Policy to submit an annual report to the governor and general assembly by November 1 of each year regarding activities and programs related to drug enforcement, substance use disorder treatment, and prevention and education programs. 
Division 9 -- Economic Development Authority (IEDA) and Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) Reports -- requires the IEDA director to submit an annual report to the authority board and the general assembly by January 31 each year detailing their activities from the previous fiscal year. Requires the IFA director to submit a similar annual report to the governor and general assembly by January 15 each year.
Division 10 -- Economic Development Authority (IEDA) and Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) Programs -- removes requirements for the IEDA to run certain internship programs and shifts this responsibility to the Iowa Department of Workforce Development. Ensures that any internships or financial aid awarded by the IEDA before the change remains valid under the new setup.
Division 11 -- Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) -- removes the requirement for the council to approve or disapprove licensing applications and related cases. Transfers certain licensing responsibilities for substance use disorder programs from the council to HHS. Updates confidentiality provisions for program records and specifies individuals and officials who may access confidential information. Adjusts procedures for debt setoffs and empowers the HHS director to engage in specific real estate activities. Modifies the process for people who owe child support to withdraw their objections by allowing written requests to be submitted to child support services.
Division 12 -- State Salaries of Appointed State Officers -- Establishes salary ranges for certain appointed state officers for fiscal years starting from July 1, 2024. Specifies that the governor shall set salaries for nonelected individuals appointed within the executive branch of state government. Salary determination considers factors such as the person's experience, changes in job duties, performance, and subordinate salaries. However, certain positions have salary determination responsibilities assigned to specific entities. 
Division 13 -- Office for State-Federal Relations -- Removes the requirement for the office to be situated in Washington, D.C., and instead states that the State-Federal Relations Office is administratively attached to the Office of the Governor.
Division 14 -- Historical Sites -- Removes the requirement for state agencies owning historical sites, except the state board of regents, to enter agreements with the Department of Administrative Services (DAS) for site management. Instead, it mandates DAS to consult with the state historic preservation officer when establishing standards and criteria for historical property acquisition and preservation. Adds developing preservation standards for historical sites to the duties of the state historic preservation officer. Requires state agencies owning historical sites to consult with the preservation officer before making modifications that could affect the site's listing on the national register of historic places and allows them to enter agreements with the preservation officer for site management. 
Division 15 -- Department of Management -- Mandates DOM to oversee a statewide integrated justice information system. Shifts responsibilities from HHS to DOM for maintaining an Iowa statistical analysis center, an Iowa correctional policy project, and a multi agency information system for juvenile and adult court records.

Signed by Governor May 17, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Government
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: HF2693
Title: Justice Systems Budget
Description:

Appropriates $693.3 million for the Attorney General, Iowa Law Enforcement Academy and Departments of Corrections, Public Safety, Homeland Security and Emergency Management and Inspections, Appeals and Licensing. This is a 3.5% increase over current budgeted levels ($24 million).  No change in funding for victim services funding. Increase of $2.8 million to the Attorney General's Office for three new attorneys, two investigators, and a paralegal.  Increases Department of Corrections by $11.9 million for county confinement ($150,000), administration ($1.3 million), Ft. Madison ($1.3 million), Anamosa ($1.9 million), Oakdale ($1.3 million), and community based corrections ($4.975 million).  Increases funding for the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy by $1.7 million and public defender by $2.8 million. Increases funding for the Department of Public Safety by $5.1 million ($1.2 million for administration, $1.5 million for DCI, and $3 million for state patrol).  No change in drug court language (continues existing drug courts). No change in funding for the Office to Combat Human Trafficking, Office of Drug Control Policy, or the Consumer Advocate. States that 1/3 the cost of basic training for a law enforcement officer be paid by the city/county and the rest by the state (current law has the state paying 1/3, the city/county paying 1/3, and the trainee paying 1/3, with the option for the city/county to pick up the candidate share of the cost).  Increases the hourly rates for court-appointed counsel by $3 for each case type beginning July 1, 2024. Effective 7/1/2024. Takes effect July 1, 2024. You can read the final nonpartisan fiscal staff review at: legis.iowa.gov/docs/publications/NOBA/1449730.pdf.

Status: Signed
Category: Budgets
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: HF2698
Title: Health/Human Services (HHS) Budget
Description:

Appropriates $2.2 billion for health and human services programs (including Medicaid) for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2024 (FY 2025).  This is a 4% increase ($88.6 million). Appropriates $468.5 million from other funds (an increase of $360,000). Aging & Disability Services ($19,088,714): Increases funding for department duties by $155,157. Eliminates line items but not the responsibility for the work. Codifies area agency on aging language that has been in the budget for more than a decade. Because of budget restructuring, this includes aging programs, state supplementary assistance, health program operations, Conner decree training, and the family support subsidy/child at home pilot. Behavioral Health ($24,400,114):  No change in funding. Continues two line items at current levels (Children's Behavioral Health System - $300,000; managed care substance use treatment transfer - $950,000). Maintains $1.75 million transfer from sports wagering receipts fund. Because of budget restructuring, this includes addictive disorders and some funding from healthy children/families. Public Health ($22,513,821): Cut of $385,000 due to moving Centers of Excellence funding to a standing (automatic) appropriation. Eliminates earmarks (but does not cut the money) for: brain injury facilitators and training ($1.055 million), epilepsy education and support ($144,000), psychology postdoctoral internships ($48,000), and psychiatric training for PAs & nurse practitioners ($150,000). Retains earmarks and funding for SafeNetRx prescription drug donation program ($600,000), rural health clinics ($25,000), specialty care access ($225,000), medical residencies ($2.1 million), rural psychiatric residencies ($800,000), and family medicine/obstetrics fellowship ($560,000). Increases earmark for free clinics by $40,000 ($374,000) to help with e-prescribing. Requires HHS to work with the Iowa Health Information Network (IHIN) to plan for program enhancements that empower Iowans with access to their health information. Because of budget restructuring, this includes healthy children/families, chronic conditions, community capacity, essential public health services, infectious diseases, public protection, congenital & inherited disorders registry, and psychiatric residency funding. Community Access ($68,043,944): This is a decrease of $2.1 million (primarily due to decreased enrollment in PROMISE JOBS and Family Investment Program/FIP). Because of budget restructuring, this includes some aging programs, human rights administration, general administration, field operations, FIP/Promise Jobs, Medicaid, children's health insurance (hawk-I), volunteer programs, chronic conditions, community capacity, and public protection).  No change for First Five Health Mental Development programs ($3.1 million), pregnancy prevention grants ($1.9 million), childcare assistance ($47.2 million), and child protective services ($62.4 million). Adds new $3 million appropriation for a new kinship stipend program (paying family members or fictive kin as foster parents for relative children placed in their care). Medicaid ($1.65 billion): Increases Medicaid by $107.2 million. This includes increases of $40.9 million increase to meet expected need, $16.5 million to replace federal funds used to increase HCBS waiver rates (aka "ARPA backfill"), $5 million for enhanced case management, $1.7 million to open more HCBS ID waiver slots, and $2.7 million for children's health insurance program to meet expected need. No change in funding for nursing home facility improvements ($900,000), and state family planning services ($3.4 million).  Reimbursement Rates: Increases reimbursement rates for HCBS waiver providers by 5% ($14.6 million), residential supported community living services ($1.4 million), home health providers ($3 million), mental health providers ($2.1 million), community mental health centers ($276,947), psychiatric medical institutions for children (PMIC) tiered rates ($369,000), physical therapists ($418,121), occupational therapists ($64,692), physician assistants ($29,691), certified nurse midwives ($3,122), air medical services ($250,000), medical equipment ($144,014), and pharmacy dispensing fees ($500,000). Health Program Operations ($39,597,231): This is an increase of $1.2 million due to contract increases. No change for state poison control center ($750,000).  Childcare Assistance ($34,966,931): No change in funding. Early Intervention & Supports ($35,277,739): No change in funding for human rights administration, community advocacy and services, early childhood Iowa ($29,256,799), More Options for Maternal Support ($1 million), and child abuse prevention (no longer line item but funding still there).  Child Protective Services ($164,101,034): This is a $2.1 million increase for programs that include child and family services and the adoption subsidy.  No change in funding for decategorization ($1,717,000), group foster care ($40.5 million), court-ordered services ($748,000), child protection center grants ($1,658,000), and Project Harmony for child abuse victims ($227,000). Increases funding for Preparation for Adult Living by $334,000 (total $4,359,500), adoption subsidies by 5% ($148,232), and foster care reimbursement rates by 5% ($308,765). State Specialty Care Services ($100,006,128): This is a small increase ($35,259) for state-owned institutions. Increases Cherokee MHI by $2.6 million, Independence MHI by $3.1 million, sex offender civil commitment at Cherokee MHI by $1.9 million, and Eldora State Training School by $961,124. No change in funding for Woodward State Resource Center ($13.4 million) and reduces funding for the Glenwood State Resource Center by $11 million ($5.3 million). Administration & Compliance ($21,194,894): Increases funding by $1.3 million.  No change in funding for ABLE Savings Account administration ($200,000), court appointed special advocate ($2.6 million), and long-term care ombudsman ($1,148,959). New $750,000 appropriation from the Autism Support Fund to non-profit provider to expand behavioral analysis (ChildServe).  Other: Gives HHS the ability to transfer funds as needed to continue realignment and maximize federal support.  Allows HHS to use up to $3 million in funds that are not used for their original purpose to pay for the Thrive Iowa Program. Increases the number of rural psychiatric residencies from six to eight annually. Allows the Office of Public Guardian to carry over unused funds into the next fiscal year. Allows up to $3 million of unused PMIC funding from the current fiscal year to be used to purchase a facility for use as a PMIC by a new out-of-state provider who will provide comprehensive services to children with sexualized and other difficult behaviors (and waives competitive bidding). Splits LIHEAP (Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program) administration between contractors (no less than 8.4%) and HHS (1.6%); currently there is a 10% cap on administration, with $377,000 going to HHS.  Removes language about an additional amount money to be transferred from the beer & liquor control fund for substance use disorder treatment (legislators have never transferred more than the base $2 million). Requires HHS to collaborate with the Department of Revenue on tobacco control enforcement. Requires the legislature to appropriate enough money each year to fully fund personal needs allowance (which is currently $50/month) and requires the allowance to be increased at the same percentage and at same time federal SSI benefits are increased. Transfers the replacement generation tax that had been going to mental health property tax relief to Medicaid (remaining funds were minimal = $12,954). Transfers remaining funds in the Medicaid Fraud Fund ($150,000) to Medicaid. Allows Medicaid recipients residing in a State MHI to keep their Medicaid eligibility during their stay at the MHI. Permits the HHS to bill for State Resource Center services utilizing a scope of services approach in a manner that does not shift costs between the Medicaid program, the MHDS regions, or other State Resource Center funding sources. Moves juvenile detention funding and current formula into Code (so it doesn't have to be in the budget each year).  States that child support recovery for state foster care payments does not apply when a child is placed with a relative or fictive kin who is not licensed as a child foster care provider. Requires nursing home quality assurance assessments to be paid monthly (rather than quarterly). Removes the requirement that quality assurance assessment forms be submitted within 30 days of the end of each calendar quarter. Requires HHS (in consultation with Medicaid provider association and stakeholders) to study options for a revised Medicaid payment model for reimbursing assisted living facilities (due 12/1/24). Reduces the number of state-funded University of Iowa psychiatric residencies from nine to seven.  Nurse Staffing Agency/Technology Platforms: Sets separate regulatory structure for a health care technology platforms that allows independent contractor nurses to bid on open shifts.  Applies to LPNs, RNs, CNAs, CMAs, home health aides, medication managers, and "non certified or unlicensed staff providing personal care).  Prohibits a health care employment agency from contracting with a health care entity if the employment agency has not registered with the Department of Inspections, Appeals & Licensing (DIAL). Eliminates fines for non-registration (was $500 for first offense, $5,000 for each subsequent offense). Requires health care technology platforms to register with DIAL ($500 annual fee). Prohibits contracting with health care providers if the platform is not registered in the state. Platforms are required to rerun background checks after two years of inactivity on the platform.  Requires the platform to make sure that professionals using the system 1) show they meet all required state qualifications for their licensure level; 2) meets minimum state licensing and certification requirements; and 3) maintain professional liability insurance ($1 million per incidence, $3 million aggregate). Prohibits the health care technology platform from restricting employment opportunities (including bans on non-competes) and from requiring payment of liquidated damages or employment fees if the person is subsequently hired by the contracting entity.  DIAL is required to set up a system to take complaints against the health care technology platform. Adds new civil penalties for any violations of the law ($25,000 after 30-day grace period).  Medical CBD Card: Allows telemedicine use for physician-patient relationship in getting a medical cannabidiol card.  Nursing Facility Oversight: Requires DIAL to host semi-annual joint trainings for inspectors and nursing facility staff reviewing at least 3 of the 10 most commonly issued federal citations during the last year (and requires inclusion of state long term care ombudsman). Requires DIAL to establish and review each citation for immediate jeopardy or substandard of care prior to issuing their final findings. Standing (Automatic) Appropriations: Includes standing appropriations for child abuse prevention ($233,000), psychiatry residencies ($1.1 million), and the congenital and inherited disorders registry ($224,000). Adds a new standing appropriation for the Centers of Excellence Grant Program ($425,000). Reduces the standing appropriation for county VA commissions by $10,000 ($990,000 total). Effective July 1, 2024. You can find the final nonpartisan staff review at: legis.iowa.gov/docs/publications/NOBA/1449788.pdf

Status: Signed
Category: Budgets
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Support
Bill Number: HJR2006
Title: Income Tax Constitutional Amendments
Description:

Proposes an ammendment to Iowa's Constitution to regulate tax bills and set one flat rate for individual income taxes. The ammendment would require that any bill raising income tax rates or adding new income-based taxes be approved by at least two-thirds of both the Iowa House of Representatives and the Iowa Senate. Additionally, it forbids Iowa from having different income tax rates for different income levels. If passed, the ammendment would need to be voted on again by the next general assembly before being approved by the public.

Status: Adopted
Category: Constitutional Amendments
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: SF2096
Title: Gender Balance Requirements
Description:

Repeals gender balance requirements for appointed local and state government boards, councils, commissions. Signed by governor April 3, 2024. Takes effect July 1, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Government
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: SF2385
Title: State Boards/Commissions
Description:

Conservation & Water Quality Committee. Implements some (but not all) of the Governor's Boards & Commissions Review recommendations.  Requires state boards & commissions be reviewed every four years. Requires all boards & commissions to allow remote participation (hybrid or virtual meetings). Allows boards & commissions to meet as needed (rather than on a schedule).  Allows DIAL staff to administratively close complaints that are not related to rule or law violations. Requires DIAL to review all professional licensing renewal cycles and develop a recommendation to create a uniform calendar for renewals across all licensing categories. Retains the requirement that the Board of Nursing's executive director be a registered nurse. Reduces the Board of Nursing from 7 to 5 members (eliminating one active RN, one nurse-educator, and one member of the public, and adding one ARNP). The new Board of Nursing will be 4 nurses (1 nurse educator, 1 active RN, 1 ARNP, and 1 LPN) and 1 member of the public. Makes the DIAL director the head of the nursing compact (but the director can designate someone else). Pays HHS Council members $10,000/year and makes the council advisory.  Eliminates the Children's Behavioral Health System Board (gives duties to HHS Council). Merges boards of psychology, behavioral health, and social work (but adds advisory committees for each of the former boards to make recommendations to full merged Board of Behavioral Health). Merges Dual Party Relay Council & Commission for Deaf Services. Merges the Child Death Review Team, Child Fatality Review Committee, and Domestic Violence Death Review Committee into a single State Mortality Review Committee. Establishes a new Soil Adds new Special Education Council (parents of children with various disabilities). Eliminates the Public Employment Relations Board and transfers authority to the Employment Appeals Board. Reduces board members on Civil Rights Commission (7:5), Human Rights Board (11:7), Innovation Council (29:9), State Historical Board (12:7), and Board of Education (10:9).  Eliminates the following boards & commissions: Advisory Committee for Children with Special Health Needs & HAWK-I Board; Advisory Committee for Perinatal Guidelines; Advisory Council for Public Outdoor Recreation and Resources; Advisory Council on Brain Injuries; Area Education Agency Advisory Group; Autism Council; Board of Hearing Aid Specialists; Board of Pharmacy Alternates; Child Care Advisory Committee; Child Support Services Task Force on Liens and Motor Vehicle Registrations; Commercial Air Service Retention and Expansion Committee; Commercial Pesticide Applicator Peer Review Panel; Commission of Latino Affairs; Commission of Native American Affairs; Commission on Community Action Agencies; Commission on Educator Leadership and Compensation; Commission on Status of African Americans; Commission on Status of Asian and Pacific Islanders; Commission on Status of Persons with Disabilities; Commission on Status of Women; Community College Council and Nonpublic School Advisory Committee; Community College Faculty Advisory Committee; Community Mental Health Centers and Disability Services Standards Advisory Committee; Congenital and Inherited Disorders Advisory Committee; Conservation Education Program Board; Consumer Advisory Panel; Dependent Adult Protective Advisory Council; Early Childhood Stakeholders Alliance; Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council; Enhance Iowa Board Family Development and Self-Sufficiency Council; Farm Deer Council; Farmer Advisory Committee; Federal Clean Air Act Compliance Advisory Panel; Fire Extinguishing System Contractors and Alarms Systems Advisory Board; Grain Industry Peer Review Panel; Horizontal and Vertical Infrastructure Bid Threshold Committee; Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management Technical Advisory Committee; Interagency Coordinating Council; Interstate Cooperation Commission; Interstate Midwest Energy Commission; Iowa Collaboration for Youth Development Council; Iowa Council on Homelessness; Iowa Cultural Trust Board of Trustees; Iowa Drug Policy Advisory Council; Iowa Great Places Board; Justice Advisory Board; Leadership Council for Child Care Training and Development; Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture Advisory Board; Ongoing Quality Faculty Plan Professional Development Committee; Organic Advisory Council; Postsecondary Course Audit Committee
Prison Industries Advisory Board; Private Pesticide Applicator Peer Review Panel; Public Funds Interest Rates Committee; Public Policy Research Foundation; Secondary Road Fund Distribution Committee; State Advisory Board for Preserves; Streamlined Sales Tax Advisory Council; Street Construction Fund Distribution Advisory Committee; Telecommunication Advisory Committee; Tourist Signing Committee; Trauma System Advisory Council; Watershed Planning Advisory Council; and Well Contractors' Council.  Requires HHS along with DIAL and other stakeholders to study the effectiveness of the Certificate of Need process and make recommendations on improvements to the process or less restrictive alternatives (report due 12/31/2024).

Signed by Governor May 17, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Government
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Track
Bill Number: SF2436
Title: Judicial Branch Budget
Description:

Appropriates $220.2 million to the judicial branch (courts) for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2024 (FY 2025).  This is an increase of $7.7 million (3.5% increase). No change in court-ordered services ($3.3 million) and juvenile delinquent graduated sanctions services ($12.3 million).  Includes 3% increase for employee salaries, 5% increase for judicial officer salaries (including judges/magistrates), and funding for increased cost of health insurance. Effective July 1, 2024. You can read the final nonpartisan fiscal staff review at: legis.iowa.gov/docs/publications/NOBA/1449729.pdf.

Status: Signed
Category: Budgets
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Undecided
Bill Number: SF2442
Title: Tax Bill
Description:

Division I – Income Tax Cut – Current law ratchets the income tax down to 3.9% by 2026.  This bill would instead lower that rate to 3.8% and have it take effect in 2025.  Also lowers the alternative minimum tax from 4.4 to 4.3%, also in 2025. 

Division II – Targeted Jobs Withholding Credit – Makes changes to the pilot program (in use in Sioux City and some other border communities), including raising an employer’s qualifying investment from $500K to $1M and changing the program’s sunset date from June 30, 2024 to June 30, 2027.

Division III – Franchise Tax changes dealing with financial institutions’ investments.

Division IV – Makes a number of property tax corrective changes, including changing dates by which local governments need to file reports with the Department of Management, the dates statements to taxpayers needs to be sent out, the information included in those statements, the examples provided to the taxpayers, etc.  This division allows Lee County to decide their courthouse/county seat situation. The division takes steps to protect the confidentiality of homestead credit applicants over the age of 65.  This division also extends by 3 years certain housing TIF projects that faced challenges due to COVID supply chain shortages.  

Division V – Compensation Elected County Officials – The bill makes a number of changes, including allowing county supervisors to establish or eliminate county compensation boards.  

Division VI – City & County Levy Growth Limitations – The bill adds a bracket into the calculations on how much cities and counties are allowed to raise their levies.  Under last year’s bill, there were three: 0% to 3% increase in growth is allowed to maintain their levy, 3%-6% growth is allowed to increase their levy by 2%, and growth exceeding 6% is allowed to increase their levy by 3%.  Under the bill, the new brackets would be: 0% to 2.75% allowed to maintain same levy, 2.75% to 4% allowed a 1% increase, 4% to 6% allowed a 2% increase, over 6% allowed a 3% increase. 

Division VII – Public Utility/Pipeline property tax assessment limitations – Under current law, property owned by such entities are assessed by the Department of Revenue and distributed to the local entities.  The bill removes the state part of this returning it to the local governments, and institutes a 2% per year rollback until those properties are assessed at 90% in 2029 (same as commercial). 

Division VIII – Taxpayer Relief Fund – The bill makes changes to the thresholds used when State revenues come in at certain levels, and how those funds are transferred.  

Division IX – Makes a corrective change to the MEGA sites bill, SF 574.

Signed by Governor May 1, 2024. Takes effect July 1, 2024.

Status: Signed
Category: Taxes
Recent Action:
Client's Position: Undecided
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